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Weird Fish adds metrics to enhance eco transparency

Clothing brand Weird Fish has ramped up its eco transparency by introducing environmental impact metrics to some of the products displayed on its website. The metrics,… View Article

FASHION RETAIL NEWS UK

Weird Fish adds metrics to enhance eco transparency

Clothing brand Weird Fish has ramped up its eco transparency by introducing environmental impact metrics to some of the products displayed on its website.

The metrics, which are attached to the organic cotton range to inform consumers about the environmental benefits of choosing organic over standard materials, are produced in partnership with eco transparency company Green Story.

The new information has been added to product descriptions so that customers can see how much has been saved in car emissions, drinking water, lightbulb energy and land pesticide usage as a result of a product being switched from regular to organic cotton.

For example, Weird Fish has included information on one product, saying: “Did you know that buying a certified organic cotton T-shirt saves a huge 2,457 litres of water over your regular, not so good for the planet, cotton T-shirt?

“That is enough for one person to drink their recommended eight glasses of water a day for three and a half years! That stat makes us thirsty for more knowledge.”

John Stockton, managing director at Weird Fish, said the metrics are there “to help inspire greener shopping habits and get more people on board with our more sustainable ranges”.

He added: “We’ve always been honest with customers about not being an 100% sustainable brand – instead, we highlight our initiatives to help us reach realistic targets each year. For instance, we’re working towards making 55% of our ranges more sustainable by the end of 2021 and by 2026, our target is to increase that figure to 90%.”

Over the past two years, Weird Fish has swapped out standard cotton with organic cotton yarns whenever possible, in line with its ‘The Only Way Is Ethics’ sustainability policy launched in 2019. Organic cotton production, on average, avoids the use of toxic chemicals and uses 88 percent less water and 62 percent less energy than conventional cotton.

According to Green Story, when compared to the global conventional cotton supply chain, Weird Fish has achieved a 51 percent reduction in blue water consumption on average across all its supply chains.

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