THE RETAIL BULLETIN - The home of retail news
Click here
Home Page
News Categories
Commentary
Department Stores
Electricals and Tech
Entertainment
Fashion
Food and Drink
General Merchandise
Grocery
Health and Beauty
Home and DIY
Interviews
People Matter
Retail Business Strategy
Property
Retail Solutions
Electricals & Technology
Sports and Leisure
Christmas Ads
Shopping Centres, High Streets & Retail Parks
Retail Events
People in Retail Awards 2024
Omnichannel Futures 2024
Retail HR Central 2024
The Future of The High Street 2024
Retail HR Summit
THE Retail Conference
Upcoming Retail Events
Past Retail Events
Retail Insights
Retail Solutions
Advertise
About
Contact
Subscribe for free
Terms and Policies
Privacy Policy
Resale platform Vestiaire Collective to stop selling fast fashion items

Second-hand fashion giant Vestiaire Collective has announced a company-wide ban on the selling of fast fashion brands with immediate effect. The Paris-based company said the move is… View Article

FASHION RETAIL NEWS UK

Resale platform Vestiaire Collective to stop selling fast fashion items

Second-hand fashion giant Vestiaire Collective has announced a company-wide ban on the selling of fast fashion brands with immediate effect.

The Paris-based company said the move is part of its “mission to drive collective change towards a circular fashion economy”, and “reinforces the notion of buying quality over quantity and encourages consumers to invest in craftsmanship at better prices”.

Vestiaire Collective said it has a three-year plan which includes enlisting an external agency to create “a robust set of ‘fast fashion’ criteria including low product quality, working conditions and carbon footprint”. Brands that fit the criteria will be banned from the site.

Banned brands so far include Shein, Asos, Atmosphère, Boohoo, Burton, Coast, Dorothy Perkins, Fashion Nova, Karen Millen, Miss Selfridge, Missguided, Na-Kd, Nasty Gal, Oasis, Pretty Little Things, Topman, Topshop.

“Fast fashion has no value, and even less in resale,” Vestiaire Collective’s chief impact officer Dounia Wone said in a statement. “We’ve taken this step because we don’t want to be complicit in this industry which has a tremendous environmental and social impact.”

Wone said the current system “encourages overproduction and overconsumption of low quality items and generates huge amounts of fashion waste”.

While fast-fashion is unarguably harmful to the environment, many proponents of the resale market argue that all fashion should be reworn rather than thrown away, including fast fashion.

Fast fashion brands are commonly sold at lower budget resale platforms, such as Depop, Poshmark, and Vinted.

Vestiaire Collective said that in order to avoid creating more waste through its ban, it is “committed to finding and promoting practical solutions for the fast fashion items that its members already have”, including wearing, repairing, recycling, upcycling, and constructive donation strategies.

The company said its latest decision came after a team of employees visited Kantamanto in Ghana, the largest reuse and upcycling economy in the world.

Roughly 15 million garments pass through the Kantamanto market each week, according to Vestiaire Collective, with 40 percent of unbaled items leaving the market as waste.

“This trip underlined the importance of taking immediate, radical action around fast fashion,” Vestiaire Collective said.

Subscribe For Retail News